The Thermometer

Have you ever picked up and moved your household?  Some people can’t stand the thought of moving…..they must have a low stress level.  Other people don’t mind moving.  BFM (that’s BeFore marriage), my wife, whose father was a teacher, Principal, and later School Superintendent, move often, as her dad found better jobs.

Since our marriage, as I’m thinking back, and I can remember five (5) moves in our 43 years.  Moving is not that bad….albeit, I like to be in control, and timelines MUST be adhered to–which moving companies seldom live up to.  However, pre-moves give you the “chance” to re-acquaint yourself with treasures forgotten.  Pre-moves also give you the “opportunity” to find the “Why in the world did we EVER keep this?” items.   “Treasures” and “what ever’s”, come from items purchased for reminiscing or as a “keep sake” passed down from generations past.

We moved into our little log cabin in the woods 9 years ago.  We unpacked this one treasure of old.  It was a thermometer, a 16 inch glass tube. Inserted in the tube were the farenheit temperature numbers, hand written on paper.  I think the story goes that my grandfather made this thermometer at this work.  Until recently, this thermometer has been kept out in the open, sitting in a Ball jar, for us to look at.  I have just recently made a cherry holder and now have it hanging in our kitchen.

As I have mentioned in previous blogs, there has been a great change, moving from common sense to stupidity.  In the old days, common sense ruled, now in the age of stupidity, everything needs to be “safe” (we need to be safe because people are stupid, ie. we sue fast food chains for selling us hot coffee that we stupidly spill in our laps, while driving, changing CD’s and simultaneously  texting).  I’m mentioning common sense stuff,  because this thermometer is MERCURY filled.  There has been a “push” of late to eradicate personal possession of mercury (for our own safety), that’s why non-electronic thermometers now have this RED fluid in them.  (If you really want to make me safe, common sense says, let’s eradicate drunk drivers, one strike you’re out–oops, sorry, political comment)

A friend and I were discussing thermometers, mercury and stuff and this remembrance came to mind.  I began remembering the first time I met mercury.  I was while attending Dyer, Indiana Junior Senior High, as a seventh grader.  This was an older, two-story, brick school building with wooden floors.  School wasn’t a “high-point” for me, I thought there were much more interesting things to do, but this one day, in seventh grade science class the teacher brought out a glass jar of mercury.  We were able to put a little in our hand, it rolled around in a little ball.  We placed for a moment on the top of the desk, in the pencil holder.  (that’s an elongated area carved out, where you can place pencils, crayons, etc., so they don’t roll down the desk top)  I believe I may have even dropped one of those little glossy, silver/gray mercury balls on that wooden floor.  Once out of your hand, they are impossible to pickup with fingers.

Holding, touching and seeing mercury is experience that my grandchildren will never have, well better safe than knowledgeable in this day and age.

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About tgriggs17

Retired, CPA, enjoy freshwater fishing, being with my grandchildren, friends and family
This entry was posted in Education, Learning, Life, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to The Thermometer

  1. We’re living in the age of the “safety police.” It’s so different than when we were kids and had the run of the neighborhood.

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